Earth is ‘five years from losing everything’ as catastrophic space junk collision threatens to wipe out communication systems

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Hunk of fast-moving space refuse could destroy Earth’s decisive communication and navigation systems “inside five years,” scientists suffer warned.

An imminent collision would accept a devastating effect on global saving, they claimed.

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Getty Likeness

Don’t be fooled by the shining skies in this snap, thither are 170 million pieces of ‘extent junk’ swirling some

Parts of space close to Earth carry become a cosmic junkyard where an estimated 170 zillion objects are left floating aimlessly.

Any are as big as spent rocket stages, others are are honest flakes of paint.

They can be begin cluttering areas surrounding hundreds of trillions of pounds worth of critical space application.

This rogue debris rushes headlong at above 16,777mph and even a smash-up with tiny pieces could annihilate satellites.

Ben Writer, head of Australia’s Room Environment Research Centre warned that “a ruinous avalanche of collisions which could quick destroy all orbiting satellites is now potential”.

Speaking to a conference of international extent environment scientists, he added: “The extension junk problem has been deed worse every year.

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“We’re losing deuce-ace or four satellites a year now to extent debris collision. We’re also close, NASA estimates, of inside five to 10 years of losing the entirety.

1bf8b5e16c031c568cf9527fb5453dda Earth is ‘five years from losing everything’ as catastrophic space junk collision threatens to wipe out communication systems

Yannaing Pyi Sone Aung

The vast piece of space debris was 4.5m deep and 1.2m wide

The world is more and more dependent on satellites for communication and steering.

They power our transport, economics and energy.

But according to space dust expert Moriba Jah, from the Lincoln of Texas, a major collision is “ineluctable” if action isn’t enchanted.

Researchers are working on a special tracker step which could help satellites detect and steer clear of deviant bits of metal.

Crack strong lasers which could “shove” debris around is added option.

A chunk of ‘Chinese’ extension debris recently crashed to Field after falling from the sky heavens Burma, whilst a piece of trash smashed into a Nasa craft in 2014.

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